Lots of shocks

What shock length will I need?

Shock length is an important question to answer.

A spring is the heart of the shock absorber on every car. They separate the car from bumps in the road, allow the axles to function, and support the entire weight of the automobile as well as its freight. If left un-monitored, a spring’s stored energy can trigger a car to jump frantically up and down after experiencing a basic bump. Automobile manufacturers discovered this at an early stage, so they needed to set up some tool to dampen the springs motion as well as soften or smooth out the ride. That device is called the shock absorber. A shock absorber must be fine-tuned to match the vehicle it’s attached to in order to work effectively.

measurement for shocksMeasuring for “Universal” Shocks

When changing the ride height of a vehicle, you will usually need new shocks. It is important to get shocks that will not bottom out or fully extend. This will limit your suspension travel and damage the shock.

If you use a suspension kit, the manufacturer will usually list recommended shocks. If you make custom suspension changes, you will need to measure for Universal Shocks. To get the right shocks, you will need to know the required extended and collapsed length.

Procedure

  1. Lift the vehicle and support the frame with Jack Stands.
  2. Remove the wheel and the existing shock. Let the axle hang free.
  3. Take the following measurements:
  • A = Distance between the upper shock mount and the lower shock mount.
    • For eyelet mounts, measure from the center of the hole.
    • For stud mounts, measure from the seating surface.
  • B = Distance between the bump stop and the axle (or frame, depending on your application).

A + 1 in. = Extended Length of the shock

(A – B) – 1 in. = Collapsed Length of the shock

Notes

  • We recommended that you:
    • Add 1 inch to the extended length, and
    • Subtract 1 inch from the collapsed length.
  • This will you give you some additional shock travel.
  • The added travel will:
    • Prevent damage to the shock, and
    • Allow for compression of the bump stop. Auto parts.shocks

Now, if you want to get you some shocks, then click here to go to a shop page chock full of shocks. Also, I’ve got another article on shocks that you might find useful. It’s called Shock Therapy for You.

I wanted to share this informational article that I found on the Summit Racing website.

Uzbasic shape
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

Write A Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Related Posts